Perceived Patient-Provider Communication Quality and Sociodemographic Factors Associated With Watching Health-Related Videos on YouTube: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

Background: Approximately 73% of US adults use YouTube, making it
the most popular social media platform. Misinformation on social
media is a growing concern; recent studies show a high proportion
of misinformative health-related videos. Several studies on
patient-provider communication and general health information
seeking have been conducted. However, few studies to date have
examined the potential association between patient-provider
communication and health information seeking on specific social
media platforms such as YouTube. A better understanding of this
relationship may inform future health communication interventions.
Objective: The aim was to use nationally representative
cross-sectional data to describe the association between perceived
patient-provider communication quality and sociodemographic factors
on watching YouTube health-related videos. Methods: Data from the
2018 Health Information National Trends Survey were analyzed
(N=3504). The primary outcome was whether participants watched a
health-related video on YouTube over the past 12 months. A
patient-provider communication composite score was created by
summing responses about how often providers did the following: (1)
gave you the chance to ask all the health-related questions you
had, (2) gave attention to your feelings, (3) involved you in
health care decisions as much as you wanted, (4) made sure that you
understood the things you needed to do to take care of your health,
(5) explained things in a way that you could understand, (6) spent
enough time with you, and (7) helped you deal with feelings of
uncertainty. Sociodemographic factors included age, gender,
race/ethnicity, and education. Descriptive statistics and
multivariable logistic regression were conducted. Results:
Approximately 1067 (35% weighted prevalence) participants reported
watching a health-related video on YouTube. Higher perceived
quality of patient-provider communication on the composite score
was significantly associated with lower odds of watching
health-related videos on YouTube. Regarding sociodemographic
factors, increasing age and being a high school graduate (compared
with college graduate) were associated with lower odds of watching
health-related videos on YouTube; whereas, Hispanic and
non-Hispanic Asians were more likely to have watched a
health-related video on YouTube. For individual aspects of
patient-physician communication, two of seven patient-provider
communication variables were significant. Those who reported that
providers “sometimes” spent enough time with them had higher
odds of watching a health-related video on YouTube, compared with
those who said providers “always” spent enough time with them.
Participants reporting that they “never” have a chance to ask
all their health-related questions also had higher odds of watching
health-related videos on YouTube compared with those who reported
“always.” Conclusions: Higher perceived quality of
patient-provider communication is associated with lower odds of
watching health-related videos on YouTube. When providers do not
spend enough time or give an opportunity to ask questions, patients
are more likely to pursue health information on social media.

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Perceived Patient-Provider Communication Quality and Sociodemographic Factors Associated With Watching Health-Related Videos on YouTube: A Cross-Sectional Analysis